Posts tagged ‘birth’

07/08/2011

The Trimble Family History, Part II

A history recap: The previous post ended with the death of James Trimble’s wife, Bettie Luella Huddleston. They had four children, Etta, Betty, Samuel, and Mayme. Betty died in infancy, and James was working as a mason and contractor.

Nannie's Death Certificate

James Trimble married for a second time around 1893, about 12 years after the death of his first wife. He married Nannie Belle Miller. Nannie was born on September 23, 1866 in Kanawha County, WV. In some of the census records, Nannie’s maiden name is Morris, but  her birth and death records list it as Miller, so I believe it was just recorded incorrectly in the old census records.  Her parents were Archibald Miller and Margaret Ann Wiseman.  James was about 42, and she was 27 years old when they married. They had six children:  Arch (May 7, 1894 – 1981 ), Mary (June 13, 1896 – 1974), Corrine (Cora) (Abt 1899 -?), Osman (January 30, 1901 – 1988), Margaret (May 22, 1903 – 1987), and Jeanetta (March 27, 1909 – 1987). According to the census records, they had another child that did not survive. I don’t have any more information than that they had 7 children, 6 living.

James Trimble died on August 22, 1918, at the age of 67. He died of some sort of hemmorage. The death certificate is illegiable beyond that. Nannie died on August 16, 1947 from congestive heart failure. Both are buried in the Pratt Cemetery.

Not as much is known about Nannie and James. It seems like census data was even more difficult to find on than James and his first wife. Many of the names of Nannie and the children were recorded incorrectly, so I’m not positive about the names and dates here. I do have an interesting story, though.

Another historical home in the town is connected to my house. This house, known as the Shields’ Cottage, was built in 1880 and originally owned by Mrs. Morris. It was originally located across the street from the Trimble farmlands. Well, my house is pretty small, so when James married Nannie, he decided to buy this home for his children with Luella, and move Nannie in my house. His children were not that young at the time. Henrietta was his oldest child and I do not have a birthdate for her, though it had to be prior to 1875, so she was over 18. Anyway, James purchased the house and had it moved diagonally, across the road, and onto his property for his children. The cottage is still in the town, with the original front door.

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05/17/2011

Stories from Clifton

Before Pratt was named after a prominent coal company, It was a settlement named Clifton from 1851-1873. Clifton was not a well populated or large settlement, but was considered to be a beautiful place.

 

 At this point the river makes a short bend, very much in the shape of a horse-shoe, and a more beautiful site for a town cannot be found anywhere in West Virginia. It is a natural location for a city, for in addition to the hundred or more acres of rolling land in this smooth bend of a picturesque river, there is a large coal field all around it, embracing perhaps nearly every class of coal that is found in West Virginia, which is a great source of wealth, and will someday, during its development, afford employment to hundreds of laborers  ( Atkinson, 1876).

These are some of the stories from the town, uncovered in the book History of Kanawha by Geo W. Atkinson (1876):

  •  Clifton was one the home of a Native American community, or a large group of settlers. Out of the 3 settlers that dug cellars for their homes, all 3 found human skeletons. It appears from the quantity of remains found that a square of ground about 10 acres of the town facing the river was a cemetary for the community. Remains were found when digging every cellar, well, and posthole. Also uncovered were earthenware pottery, bone necklaces, carved shells, bone fishhooks, and an image carved into stone.
  •  One of the more prominent settlers, Mr. Marshall Hansford, found in a posthole sheets of rolled copper, and while digging his cellar, found the skeleton of a large-sized man, and a great variety of bones of birds, bears, and other wild animals. To determine the age of the remains, Mr. Hanford offered that just before the remains were discovered, they were covered with sycamores that were fully five hundred years old.
  • Paint Creek, near Clifton was the site of a stone with a carved fish. Someone tried to carry off the stone to use in the construction of a hearth, and broke it, though part of the fish was still visible in 1876.
  • In 1776 or 1777, a man named Robert Hughes was captured by Native Americans, presumably the Shawnee,  in the Clifton area. At the time, only two families were settled in Clifton, and it was considered unsafe to venture too far from the town, as Native American were often seen in the surrounding areas. Apparently, Hughes did not heed these warnings, as he maintained a fish trap at the mouth of Paint Creek, near Clifton, that he checked every morning. He was captured by 5 Native Americans one morning as he went to check the trap. The Native Americans took him about 30 miles up the creek, to their settlement. They stayed within the creek bed, as to avoid leaving any signs or clues for others to follow. Villagers looked for Hughes, but had to abandon the search because of the lack of a trail. Interestingly enough, Hughes returned about two years later. He reported that he had went to the head of Paint Creek, and eventually ended up on the Little Miami river. During his time with the Native Americans, he had learned to speak Shawnee fluently and became familiar with most of their customs. He enjoyed telling the story of his capture to anyone that would listen, and was said to be quite entertaining. He claimed that he was forced to run the gauntlet on two occasions, and that her was saved from being burnt at the stake by the daughter of a chief. He was reportedly a good hunter, and after living with the Native Americans for a year,  was frequently sent off alone to hunt. It was on one of these trips that he escaped to Point Pleasant, and eventually back to his home. Another man was taken along with Hughes, but there is no record of what happened to him.

    Examples of Native American Pottery found in the area

 

03/04/2011

The Story of a Mason

After finding out the house was  “the James Trimble House” in the Historic District of Pratt, the first thing I did was to search for more information on about James Trimble. Okay, that’s a lie. The first thing I did was exclaim “Wait! There’s a historic district in Pratt !?!” Then, after I drove by slowly and gawked at all my neighbors’ houses that also live in the historic district, googling could commence. This is what I discovered:

James W. Trimble (1851 - 1918) Death Certificate

James W. Trimble was born in January 1851 in Fayette County, Virginia. He died at the age of 67 on August 22, 1918 in Pratt, WV. His parents were Osman Trimble (1812 – 1893) and Jeanetta White (1829-1893). He married his first wife, Bettie Luella Huddleston, on July 2, 1873.  Now Bettie Lou’s parents were Job Huddleston (1814-1893) and Elizabeth McCoy (1826-after 1911). She was born on July 1, 1856 in Kanawha County, Virginia.  Don’t let the Virginia part throw you, as we were still a part of Virginia in 1851, WV became a state in 1863  (and no, I never won the Golden Horseshoe).

Birth Record for Mary "Mayme" Trimble (1879-?)

James and Bettie had 4 children, Henrietta (?-?), Betty (about 1875 ), Samuel (about 1877), and Mary (about 1879 – ?). Here is where it gets a little murky. Betty, born in 1875, died in infancy. Henrietta, is sometimes referred to as “Etta”. Eventually, Mary is referred to as “Mayme” in the census and marriage records and there is another, younger Mary Trimble. So, I’ll probably refer to her as Mayme from here.  Bettie never lived in my house, as she died on April 18, 1881. James remarried, and had more children, but I’ll save that for another day.

James W. Trimble  was listed as a mason, and a contractor on his death certificate, as well as on both the 1870 and 1880 census records. So what does all this mean? I’m not really sure. Is it a way to connect? Feel closer to the house and the people who created it…probably. I think it adds more to the mystery, and to the story. The house has a brick foundation and brick fireplace. Did James lay the brick for house? Build the mantle and foundation with his own hands? Did Bettie design the house before passing away? Or was it James, or his second wife that decided where the rooms should be? These things will probably never be known. Yet, it is fun to try. I can imagine James picking out the spot for the house, laying out each brick, to provide a home for his family. Now, it will be my home. Thanks, James.

*Post edited 3/28/2011 to incorporate new information obtained from the town archives