Posts tagged ‘trimble’

07/08/2011

The Trimble Family History, Part II

A history recap: The previous post ended with the death of James Trimble’s wife, Bettie Luella Huddleston. They had four children, Etta, Betty, Samuel, and Mayme. Betty died in infancy, and James was working as a mason and contractor.

Nannie's Death Certificate

James Trimble married for a second time around 1893, about 12 years after the death of his first wife. He married Nannie Belle Miller. Nannie was born on September 23, 1866 in Kanawha County, WV. In some of the census records, Nannie’s maiden name is Morris, but  her birth and death records list it as Miller, so I believe it was just recorded incorrectly in the old census records.  Her parents were Archibald Miller and Margaret Ann Wiseman.  James was about 42, and she was 27 years old when they married. They had six children:  Arch (May 7, 1894 – 1981 ), Mary (June 13, 1896 – 1974), Corrine (Cora) (Abt 1899 -?), Osman (January 30, 1901 – 1988), Margaret (May 22, 1903 – 1987), and Jeanetta (March 27, 1909 – 1987). According to the census records, they had another child that did not survive. I don’t have any more information than that they had 7 children, 6 living.

James Trimble died on August 22, 1918, at the age of 67. He died of some sort of hemmorage. The death certificate is illegiable beyond that. Nannie died on August 16, 1947 from congestive heart failure. Both are buried in the Pratt Cemetery.

Not as much is known about Nannie and James. It seems like census data was even more difficult to find on than James and his first wife. Many of the names of Nannie and the children were recorded incorrectly, so I’m not positive about the names and dates here. I do have an interesting story, though.

Another historical home in the town is connected to my house. This house, known as the Shields’ Cottage, was built in 1880 and originally owned by Mrs. Morris. It was originally located across the street from the Trimble farmlands. Well, my house is pretty small, so when James married Nannie, he decided to buy this home for his children with Luella, and move Nannie in my house. His children were not that young at the time. Henrietta was his oldest child and I do not have a birthdate for her, though it had to be prior to 1875, so she was over 18. Anyway, James purchased the house and had it moved diagonally, across the road, and onto his property for his children. The cottage is still in the town, with the original front door.

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05/30/2011

About Wolves, and the Lack of Updates

I know there has been a distinctive lack of updates recently. It has been a busy month full of family gatherings, graduations,  and a wedding (Congrats to N & B!).  So we have been having a little mini break away from the house, where we have been helping my dad build and decorate a chicken coop and attending these functions. Not a lot of progress has been made since the termite treatment was completed earlier this month. I promise  a photo update soon, but since I have a virus of some sort, it is going to have to wait.

Meanwhile, here is something to read from the former owner of the house, a clipping about wolf hybrids in WV. After all, he did have a wolf hybrid. It has some random numbers scribbled on it, as most things from the house.  I blurred out anything that resembled phone numbers, just to be safe!

Article about Wolf Hybrids Found in the House

05/07/2011

A House History

Do you remember when I met the town historian of that fateful Saturday, and found a wealth of history about my house? Well one of the most interesting documents was the house history compiled by the architects that helped to make Pratt’s historical District. Because my house is “pivotal” to the historic designation, they wrote up everything they could gather about it, along with the other “pivotal” historic houses in the district.  Here is a copy of the document from the archive, entitled The Trimble Farm.

For many years the tract of land between Pratt and Paint Creek belonged to the Trimble family. Much of the area was put into farm land and beside it lay the old road to Hansford just north of the acreage and parallel to the C&O Railway. This county road crossed the Old Iron Paint Creek Bridge (now gone) and the vestiges of the wagon tracks can still be located on the Hansford side of the creek.

The early dwelling of the Trimble family was located on the east side of Paint Creek and was called “The Carrol House”. The grandparents of (today’s family) Osman Stockton Trimble and Jeanetta (White) Trimble bought the two-story frame house from Van B. Hanna and his wife Lucy. Later the house, unoccupied, burned and no sign of it remains today.

So the Trimble family originally lived in another house. I have never seen the wagon tracks that they mention in this document, but I’m not really certain where the old bridge was located, either. I’ll have to track that down and see if they are still there! I am skeptical about that, though.

Up in the village, however, near where Ferry Street became the original country road, James Trimble built a frame dwelling where many later generations grew up. The house still stands where it was built and it has kept its original design. It is an “L” shape with the lower end of the “L” facing the road. This gable end is covered with fish scale shingles at the top, and below contains a beautiful, small three-window bay that is capped with a decorative metal roof. Each side of this facade is flanked by matching ends of porches — the west side a very small porch and the east a part of the major porch that extends along the inner side of the “L”. The white-painted house (now with a composition roof) is in good condition and at present time is a rental property.

Behind the dwelling the land slopes down into a beautiful park-like area shaded by huge elm trees and extending several acres to the west. The remains of the Paint Creek railroad spur curls around the property and has become an access road to the lower end of the village. When Mr. Trimble sold the land for this railroad spur, he required the Company to build a wooden fence between the right-of-way and his home in order to protect his family and small children.

An old picture of the Trestle

Unfortunately, this land had been changed considerably since this document was written. I believe most of this railroad spur was demolished when another house was put behind my house. I have not seen any remains of it. Also, there is no longer a wooden fence around the property.

This tract of land from Ferry Street to Paint Creek, properly called the “Trimble Addition”, has been divided into lots and now is filled with neat, modern homes. No vestige of the old frame home on the Creek remains, but according to one source, some of the bricks from the place were used in the construction of part of the houses that were built in the addition  by members of the family. The remaining members still living in the village are Osman Trimble, Margaret Trimble Jarrett, and Jeanetta Trimble Montgomery

Obviously, there is a lot of information about the house in this document, gathered from descendents of the original builder of the home. Unfortunately, they have all passed away in the 20 years or so since this document was written.

04/19/2011

A Brief History of Pratt, WV 1781-1913

So, I bought an old house, in an old town. I could just study the history of the house, but then the story would have no context. I would not understand about the climate, the feeling of  the town when the house was built. Knowledge about the era, about the Zeitgeist, leads to a better understanding of the people who lived there.

Inside the old church. Too bad this one was torn down.

 The town of Pratt was established in 1905. It had a few names before it accepted “Pratt” as the name. The area was settled as early as 1781, and early settlers trickled in until about 1850. Two prominent families in the area settled here, the Hansford family and the Morris family. Dickinson Morris built his own home, “Harmony Hill”, and laid out the town in 1851, naming it Clifton. Prior to the establishment of Clifton, a church was formed. The Old Kanawha Baptist Church was established in 1796 by James Johnstone.  The church is still around today, though only on the same lot, not in the same building. In the winter of 1861-62, Clifton served as the headquarters of the 37th Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War. The Marshall Hansford House was the headquarters of Union Colonel Siber.

After the Civil War, The town expanded, and adopted a new name “Dego”, used from 1873-1899. Obviously, when my

Mining Tents at Pratt, from the state archives

 house was built, the town was “Dego”. The Town Hall was established in 1875. In the 1880s,  coal companies became prominent in much of upper  Kanawha Valley, and Dego was no exception. In 1889 the Charles Pratt Coal Company made Dego the home of their headquarters. This was kind of a big deal, as The Charles Pratt Coal Company owned an extensive amount of mines in Paint Creek, an area adjacent to Dego. the town was renamed “Pratt”, after the coal company,  when it was incorporated in 1905. Many of the structures built by the coal company, including the clubhouse for miners and the company houses still stand in the town today.

Mother Jones, from the state archives

In 1912-13, Pratt gained notoriety as the place where “Mother” Jones was imprisoned during the “Mine Wars”. The Mine Wars were a series of confrontations between striking miners and the coal companies. After the Mine Wars were over, it was estimated that they cost nearly a million dollars and caused the violent deaths of 50 people, not including the miners that dies of malnutrition and starvation while on strike. Pratt served as the headquarters for the coal company guards, or “thugs”, and eventually became the headquarters of the WV National Guard when 3 separate times martial law was instituted during the mine wars. Martial law was necessary in Pratt and the surrounding areas because of the “state of lawlessness and insurrection” in the town. Because it was the headquarters to these factions, Pratt also served as the site for the “bullpens” where many striking miners were detained by  “military tribunals”. Mother Mary Jones was a union organizer that was imprisoned in Pratt in Mrs. Carney’s Boarding House. She managed to smuggle a message to Indiana Senator John W. Kern, He read her message on the floor of the senate. Mother Jones was put on trial in the I.O.O.F. Building, but was released by Governor Henry D. Hatfield was able to instigate a settlement between the coal operators and miners.

The mine wars were probably Pratt’s most notable event in history. I will have to do a lot more research to find out what occurred between the end of the mine wars and now. Maybe I should contact my local historian again?

The Train Station that use to stand in the town.

  

04/04/2011

Jeanetta Was Not Blinded by Science: a Book Post

A new type of post! When we purchased the house it had maybe 100 old books and magazines in it, many nearly 100 years old.  Unfortunately, they were all stored in the basement for at least 20 years or more. This resulted in all of them being covered in disgusting amounts of mold and filth. I tried cleaning some of them up, but it was impossible. They just fell apart, and crumbled. I went through them all and kept the ones with interesting inscriptions, or pictures and plan to scan them in. That way I at least have a digital record of this part of the house.

Cartoons from the back cover, including a dutch "girl" and a "toothless flapper".

This is A Year in Science, published in 1916. It appears to be a school book of Jeanetta Trimble, one of James’ daughters with his second wife. From the amount of doodling and drawing in the book, it seems that science was not her favorite subject in school. She used the book in 1925, as per the inscriptions and dated absence forms that I found inside. She called herself “Sheba”, and had little conversations and cartoons with a friend or classmate that she called “Sheik”.

"Sheik" and "Sheba" Cartoons

Other Doodles:

Cover                                                                       

                   
03/28/2011

Spontaneous Discoveries, and Old Photos

A few days ago,  I was reminded that best adventures are unplanned. I fully intended to walk around Pratt, and take pictures of some of the remaining historical details for the blog. I started as planned, but was quickly sidetracked by a moving sale. While there, I met one of the town historians and keeper of the keys to the town archive. I had gone to the Old Town Hall and asked before, but it was during a sale, and I’m not sure the women working at the time knew what I was asking about. This lovely lady from the yard sale, showed me the archives, which were awesome, and let me photograph many of the old pictures, articles, and paperwork. I came away with a wealth of knowledge, and I’m sure there will be many blog posts stemming from this encounter in the future. I definitely appreciate her help and storytelling abilities.

It is because of this that I ended up with old-home-owner gold. A very old picture of the house, lots of information about the family that built it and lived there, and an interesting,  albeit grainy,  picture of the original builder!

The Trimble House - Home of one of the earlier families that settled the town.

Look how small the maples are! To me, it looks like there have not been  many changes to the house over the years.  The bay is original, although the angle of the photograph makes the roofline look smaller. The bay window  does not have the original windows, unlike the rest of the house. these are more decorative, and may be stained glass, I can’t tell. Unfortunately, now they are old aluminum windows. Though with the current road configurations, the bay window is towards the side of the house, but the Old County Road use to connect with Trimble Lane, making this the original front of the house. However, this picture is useful in that it tells me that their used to be gingerbread on the columns, which still remain on the house, and that their were no railings. It also shows some of the elaborate woodwork that used to be on the house. Look at the moldings under the bay window!

From Left: Ott Garnette, Ed Johnson, Dillard Jarrett, Joe Bott, James Trimble, and Tom Burke. This old photograph was taken in front of Holt's Store in 1910.

 

Captions and photographs can be found in Pratt’s Bicentennial Book, published in 1976. More information on the Trimble family can be found in this post.

03/26/2011

Another Brick in the Wall?

The Trimble Brick Plant

Another history post! Remember the old brick I found in the house, mentioned in this post, marked Trimble, O? My uncle was intrigued and looked into it a bit. He found this site and this site mention a Trimble Brick Company in Trimble, Ohio. Turns out, that is where the brick was manufactured. In the 1880’s -1930’s brickmaking flourished within the Hocking Valley in Ohio, one of these plants was the Trimble Brick Company. I could not find an exact date that the Trimble Brick Company was established, but it was in full swing in 1904. It specialized in paving brick, sidewalk brick, and some building brick. Trimble, Ohio maintains that brick from the Trimble Brick Plant was used to pave the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 1909-1910. Yet, the Trimble Brick Company was not the only brick company to make this claim. Another Ohio company, The Metropolitan Paving Company also claims that their brick was used for this purpose. The speedway claims that only brick from Indiana was used.

Mining the Brick Materials for the Trimble Plant, 1910

What makes all of this more interesting was that the first street paved with bricks from the Hocking Valley, bricks made specifically for paving streets, was in Charleston, WV. It was paved in 1873, with “good quality brick” and was reportedly still in working order in 1929.

A better picture of the brick

So, even though I know where and when the brick was manufactured and made, I still have no idea why it was at the house. Did someone take it because of the Trimble connection? That is my guess. If I was a mason, I would think it was pretty cool to have a brick with my name on it. I wonder if there was more to the story, though. Was this brick one that was used to pave the roads of Charleston? Did James Trimble or one of his sons help pave , or repair the road in Charleston, and that is how they ended up with it? That is all supposition, and I will probably never know for sure, but I did end up with a great souvenir!

Another view of the Trimble Brick plant

03/04/2011

The Story of a Mason

After finding out the house was  “the James Trimble House” in the Historic District of Pratt, the first thing I did was to search for more information on about James Trimble. Okay, that’s a lie. The first thing I did was exclaim “Wait! There’s a historic district in Pratt !?!” Then, after I drove by slowly and gawked at all my neighbors’ houses that also live in the historic district, googling could commence. This is what I discovered:

James W. Trimble (1851 - 1918) Death Certificate

James W. Trimble was born in January 1851 in Fayette County, Virginia. He died at the age of 67 on August 22, 1918 in Pratt, WV. His parents were Osman Trimble (1812 – 1893) and Jeanetta White (1829-1893). He married his first wife, Bettie Luella Huddleston, on July 2, 1873.  Now Bettie Lou’s parents were Job Huddleston (1814-1893) and Elizabeth McCoy (1826-after 1911). She was born on July 1, 1856 in Kanawha County, Virginia.  Don’t let the Virginia part throw you, as we were still a part of Virginia in 1851, WV became a state in 1863  (and no, I never won the Golden Horseshoe).

Birth Record for Mary "Mayme" Trimble (1879-?)

James and Bettie had 4 children, Henrietta (?-?), Betty (about 1875 ), Samuel (about 1877), and Mary (about 1879 – ?). Here is where it gets a little murky. Betty, born in 1875, died in infancy. Henrietta, is sometimes referred to as “Etta”. Eventually, Mary is referred to as “Mayme” in the census and marriage records and there is another, younger Mary Trimble. So, I’ll probably refer to her as Mayme from here.  Bettie never lived in my house, as she died on April 18, 1881. James remarried, and had more children, but I’ll save that for another day.

James W. Trimble  was listed as a mason, and a contractor on his death certificate, as well as on both the 1870 and 1880 census records. So what does all this mean? I’m not really sure. Is it a way to connect? Feel closer to the house and the people who created it…probably. I think it adds more to the mystery, and to the story. The house has a brick foundation and brick fireplace. Did James lay the brick for house? Build the mantle and foundation with his own hands? Did Bettie design the house before passing away? Or was it James, or his second wife that decided where the rooms should be? These things will probably never be known. Yet, it is fun to try. I can imagine James picking out the spot for the house, laying out each brick, to provide a home for his family. Now, it will be my home. Thanks, James.

*Post edited 3/28/2011 to incorporate new information obtained from the town archives